A Recent Training Teaches Activists How to Connect the Dots Between Human Trafficking and Child Abuse

For every reported case of abuse, two go unreported. The solution to reduce child abuse is to focus on prevention. (photo credited by shutter stock)

For every reported case of abuse, two go unreported. The solution to reduce child abuse is to focus on prevention. (Photo by shutterstock.com)

Parents can utilize free human rights education materials to educate their children on their human rights and help prevent them from becoming a victim of trafficking.

Parents can utilize free human rights education materials to educate their children on their human rights and help prevent them from becoming a victim of trafficking.

“What Are Human Rights?” educational booklet provided free of charge by Youth for Human Rights International

“What Are Human Rights?” educational booklet provided free of charge by Youth for Human Rights International

National Office Director Erica Rodgers speaking on the need for human rights education at Youth for Human Rights International educational exhibit in Washington, DC, last fall.

National Office Director Erica Rodgers speaking on the need for human rights education at Youth for Human Rights International educational exhibit in Washington, DC, last fall.

The similarities between human trafficking and child abuse are worth knowing. Do you know the signs?

By understanding their human rights, children gain confidence in their ability to defend their human rights. Strong-willed and confident children are less likely to be the targets of traffickers”

— Erica Rodgers, Director of the National Office of Youth for Human Rights

WASHINGTON, DC, USA, June 3, 2020 /EINPresswire.com/ — With children and teenagers spending more time at home due to the COVID-19 pandemic, it is important to be aware of the warning signs of child abuse and neglect. According to The Family Tree, a non-profit organization based out of Baltimore, a child is reported abused or neglected every 10 minutes in Maryland.

“For every reported case of abuse, two go unreported,” the website states. “Child abuse and neglect cost Maryland taxpayers $1.5 billion each year.” The solution to reduce child abuse? Focus on prevention. That is exactly what human rights advocates did when they attended a recent online training hosted by The Family Tree to teach advocates how to recognize signs of child abuse and how those can lead to signs of human trafficking. Representatives from Youth for Human Rights Washington, D.C., participated in the training and spoke on how human rights education also plays an important role in the fight to end both child abuse and human trafficking.

“By understanding their human rights, children gain confidence in their ability to defend their human rights. Strong-willed and confident children are less likely to be the targets of traffickers,” said Erica Rodgers, Director of the National Office of Youth for Human Rights, who attended the training.

What are the differences between child abuse and human trafficking?

Child abuse is child maltreatment, including neglect, physical abuse, sexual abuse, exploitation and emotional abuse by any parent or other person who has permanent or temporary care or custody or responsibility for supervision of a child.

Human trafficking, in its most basic form, is fraudulently, forcibly, or coercively using another for purposes of exploitation. There are two main types of human trafficking: sex trafficking and labor trafficking. Victims can come from all backgrounds but the one thing they have in common is a vulnerability that is being exploited. Children, being especially impressionable at a young age, can become incredibly vulnerable to exploitation under the certain circumstances.

There are many ways child abuse and human trafficking can intersect. Experiences of neglect or abuse lead to increased risk of vulnerability to human trafficking. Children subjected to sexual abuse from a family member or family acquaintance would be at a higher risk. Furthermore, children who have feelings of isolation or emotional distress are considered “perfect targets” for traffickers. Traffickers are known for preying on the vulnerability of their victims.

Everyone has a role to play in combating both human trafficking and child abuse. Recognizing the signs is the first step to identifying a victim. Signs mentioned in the training to look out for in children include:

– Unexplained bruises or scars
– Fear, anxiety, clinging or phobias
– Nightmares, sleeping problems
– Demonstrates bizarre, sophisticated, or unusual sexual knowledge or behavior for the child's age
– Signs of drug addiction
– Sudden changes in clothes or expensive positions
– Sudden changes in friends and access to money
– Multiple phones or social media accounts

Anyone can help report human trafficking or child exploitation by paying attention to the red flags listed above and reporting them in a timely manner. It is better to call and report suspected trafficking than not to report at all. By identifying victims and reporting tips, you are doing your part to help law enforcement rescue victims, and you might save a life.

National Human Trafficking Hotline (NHTH), call 1-888-373-7888 or text HELP or INFO to BeFree (233733).

If you think a child is being exploited online, the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children has a 24/7 CyberTipline where you can anonymously report tips at: https://www.missingkids.org/gethelpnow/cybertipline

You can learn more about the signs of human trafficking by reading other free resources provided by organizations such as the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children: https://www.missingkids.org/theissues/trafficking

Youth for Human Rights International has been working to prevent human trafficking on a national and international level for over a decade. Raising awareness of human rights is the necessary undercut to this and so many other human rights issues. Article 4 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights states: “No one shall be held in slavery or servitude; slavery and the slave trade shall be prohibited in all their forms.” To read all of the human rights as listed in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights go to: http://www.un.org/en/universal-declaration-human-rights

About Youth for Human Rights:

Youth for Human Rights International (YHRI) is a nonprofit organization whose mission is to teach youth about human rights, specifically the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and to inspire them to become valuable advocates for tolerance and peace. YHRI advocates for human rights both in the classroom and in nontraditional educational settings such as through art series, concerts and other interactive community events, including regional and international human rights summits which bring youth together from across whole sectors of the world. Their most recent campaign has included #KnowYour30 with the deliberate purpose of increasing awareness of the 30 human rights every person has – and how they are a part of everyday life. To learn more about human rights go to https://www.youthforhumanrights.org. For a documentary on Youth for Human Rights and its founder, go to https://www.scientology.tv/series/voices-for-humanity/mary-shuttleworth.html.

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Source: EIN Presswire